In Which We Open Up All Of Our Office Hours

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Red Dust

by LINDA EDDINGS

Office hours begin at three. Who knows how long they’ll last?

I run into my therapist at the opening of a local juice bar. She does not see me, but I notice that her hair is done in a completely different fashion than what I have come to expect. I am so shaken I have to sit down.

On a bus downtown, a man carries a thousand little parcels and packages, attached to each other by string, cord and tape. A teenager asks him if it is an exhibit or something. The man opens one of the packages and inside is a business card.

My friend Stacy is a major theme of this essay. She has a very useful test that I have sort of made my own. If she meets a new person, she has these two restaurants that are very easy to confuse and not far from each other. She shows up at one, and if he doesn’t, well that’s just too bad.

Instead of finding out what someone is like when they are really, truly angry, make them a little angry.

My therapist recently discovered some of the things I had written about her. She says, “Your depiction portrays me as sounding weird.” She says, “Self-expression is the most innocent form of flattery,” and then she rotates a mug in her hands upwards of ten times. I say, “Your hero is Kafka? Your summer palace is on the Rhine? You say you have questions for me?”

In Agata & Valentina, Emmy Rossum asks an employee for aspargus. My dad called to tell me to watch the full moon tonight. “Did you ever think there were so many types of lettuce?” he says. His version of being retired is like a bird who has had a wing repaired, but doesn’t know it.

My brother is getting married in the fall. I am very happy for him, the way you go to one store in a strip mall, and another store is celebrating their grand opening. You wish and don’t wish the attention was elsewhere. I am so tired of the concept of attention. It seems like a modern conceit, maybe the only modern conceit. One that demands we be observed or acknowledged.

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Stacy has a boyfriend now. When she tried the restaurant trick on him, he said he doesn’t like to meet women at restaurants. Stacy says that it’s because he feels uncomfortable eating in front of other people, like he is a pig at the trough. Do you see the connection between this anecdote and the line about attention? Would you even notice if the moon in the sky was upside down.

Lately I have been doing a lot of whispering. Nattering quietly to myself is the function of living alone, in the apartment I am renting. It was just built, and so no one in the building expects anything to break. I’d like to own a place, but not in New York City. Maybe somewhere upstate.

My therapist wants to know my evaluation of her. “I love how available you make yourself,” I begin. “Once I saw you in a juice bar… Never mind, never mind! I think that you are great at staying internally consistent. Sometimes I wonder if you are remembering what I said or remembering what you said. Then I think, what’s the difference? If you hear one side of the conversation, you can probably reconstruct the other! It will be as if one person is there, and the second participant exists only as a shadow of the initial act.” She says, “I’m not a shadow of you, Linda,” and sips Tropicana.

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Last night I walked along 60th at the bottom of Central Park. Rats sprang out of the greenery to feast upon all the leftover horse feed. They are mad to be satiated, wild with abandon. In order to start a new thought, it takes more than simply matching the taste to the palate.

Stacy thinks she is in love with her boyfriend. “He’s kind of a weird guy,” she confesses. I ask if it something other than his apparent eating issues. She says that when they went to the movies the other night, she found herself massaging his temples and touching his dick. I ask if he told her to do that. “It seemed implied,” she says, cutting celery into the smallest possible pieces.

I want you to know that standing there is no more than an affectation.

My dad asks me to choose a color. He’s painting my old room. “What goes on in there now?” I ask. “Mostly the same stuff as when you were here,” he says, even though that was very long ago now. “Self-loathing. Pride. Catnaps. Sometimes I come in here when your mother is snoring.” I say, “Imagine being invisible only at night.” Half the shades he forces me to compare I can’t manage to see any difference. I imagine that for a god, the variation between the worst human being and the best would be this kind of tiny shift in color.

For example, have you looked at the Periodic Table of the Elements lately? Has there ever been a more outright obvious scam?

I ask my therapist about Stacy’s boyfriend. “They were in line at Starbucks,” I say, “and someone stepped in front of them. He got all up in the guy’s face and smacked down his coffee cup.” She says, “So?” I say, “Isn’t that kind of reckless and unwarranted?” She lets out a sigh that could inflate a balloon.

Full moon tonight. I whisper it and text everyone I know (the list is not long – as I get older it is more difficult to meet new people, and even when I find someone I like, the context is always wrong). In my text I detail how much more fun it will be when we are all wolves. Imagine the licking alone! I crow and cackle. Feeling like I could run up the face of a mountain, I start crumpling up all the useless pieces of paper I keep around here. Everything made or unmade was with my hands.

Linda Eddings is the senior contributor to This Recording. She is a writer living in Brooklyn. You can find an archive of her writing on This Recording here.

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